Sara Storer on realising how 'fragile' the land is without rain

STORIES OF THE LAND: Sara Storer will perform at Club Sapphire, Merimbula on Saturday, May 18 along with special guests that include her brother.
STORIES OF THE LAND: Sara Storer will perform at Club Sapphire, Merimbula on Saturday, May 18 along with special guests that include her brother.

ARIA and 21 Golden Guitar award-winning musician Sara Storer does not mince words when it comes to explaining the dire situation currently faced by Australia's farmers.

"There's been years of talk of staying positive, get through another year and the rain will come. But it hasn't come," she said as she was driving to pick up two of her kids from the school bus.

"I feel for the farmers, I think they're at the end of their tether.

"There's only so many years you can run in a drought where you do have backup plans. But now the drought has been going for so long I think people are running out of options.

"I can't see farms coping a lot more and there will be people leaving the land."

Sara Storer - Raindance

She lives with her husband and their four sons on a farm north of Albury where they run cattle and sheep.

While it has been dry around home, recently some rain had fallen with Storer saying it was amazing how the area greened up.

During the drought she did have to bring in hay to feed her stock, but she said all in all they were not too badly off.

"Some places you see around here you realise how desperate they are for a bit of rain," the 45-year-old said.

"I think you realise how fragile it it is, just having a few months without rain."

She said the title track and first single off her recently-released album Raindance was a positive song of breaking the drought through dance.

"It's just a crazy, silly thought, but it's said with good humour," she said.

Storer describes herself as a storyteller who writes about issues that matter to her, stories from her own life as well as other people's lives she has collected while travelling around the country.

What she discovered from meeting and talking to people around Australia as she toured is that this country's people are very resilient, always ready to help and starting to care about many issues.

"They're very concerned about the environment, what's going on with mining and gas," she said.

"Aussies are starting to question things and I think its really good we're standing up and saying 'that's not what we want in this country'."

It has now been almost two decades since she released her first album, Chasing Buffalo, and she has released a new album almost every two years since.

When she looks back on almost 20 years in music, she marvels at how quickly it has gone.

"How in hell did I write all those songs?" she laughed.

"After every album I go 'that's it, I've got nothing left'. But then for some reason you end up with another 12 tracks."

Sara Storer will perform at Club Sapphire, Merimbula on Saturday, May 18. Doors 8pm, tickets $35.

Joining her on tour are special guests Shanley Del and James Gillard along with Storer's brother, and sometime songwriting partner, Greg Storer.

This story Sara Storer on realising how 'fragile' the land is without rain first appeared on Bega District News.

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