Whose medal are you wearing for Anzac Day? Portraits of our veterans

Retired from National Service Lawrence Weymouth. Photo: Rachel Mounsey

Retired from National Service Lawrence Weymouth. Photo: Rachel Mounsey

On Anzac Day, war medals are taken out of drawers, unwrapped, polished and pinned to proud chests.

I remember as a young girl the joy of seeing my own Pa pinning his shiny WWII medals to his suit jacket, before parting his hair and setting off early to march in the Anzac parade. I also remember the excitement I felt thinking one day I too will be able to wear his medals as proudly as he did.

At the time, being a young girl, I wasn't fully aware that that meant he might no longer be around to wear them himself.

The honour of wearing family medals has become more and more common as many of our returned service men and women pass away.

Kevin Jackson wears his father's medals. Photo: Rachel Mounsey

Kevin Jackson wears his father's medals. Photo: Rachel Mounsey

There are rules however to how they are worn. Ex serviceman Alan Gardner who served in Vietnam reminded me of these rules on Thursday at Eden's Anzac Day parade.

"You only wear your own medals on the left hand side," he said.

"If you are wearing medals in honour of somebody, pin them on the right hand side."

Whose medals were you wearing yesterday? We asked a few people over lunch at the Eden RSL whose medals they had proudly pinned to their chests.

Comments