Playing two-up on Anzac Day? Here's all you need to know

Anzac Day is the biggest day of the year for RSL sub-branches across the country and the only day you are allowed to play two-up.

The game was brought over to Australia by the English and Irish, originally called pitch and toss, it was a popular pastime with soldiers during WWI.

Come in spinner: Bets being placed outside the ring, head betters generally hold the money before the coin toss.

Come in spinner: Bets being placed outside the ring, head betters generally hold the money before the coin toss.

Large crowds are expected at pubs and clubs across the Bega Valley Shire to celebrate true Aussie spirit and mateship over a game of two-up.

Bega's "boxer" Simon Owens prepares for the annual two-up festivities at Club Bega with club general manager Dave Mitchell and Kyle Bourke.

Bega's "boxer" Simon Owens prepares for the annual two-up festivities at Club Bega with club general manager Dave Mitchell and Kyle Bourke.

Operations manager of Club Bega Kyle Bourke reminds everyone to remember the true meaning of Anzac Day and to drink responsibly.

Anzac Day is a national day that should be viewed as a solomn thing. Its a day to do what is Australian but to remember the fallen, he said.

We encourage people to drink responsibly and to take on the right message of the day.

Two-up explained

Did you know? Traditionally, the game is played with two coins.

To create a game that is faster we use three which gets a result almost every time, Club Bega ringkeeper Simon Owens said.

The spinner holding the kip with three pennies, the tail side of pennies will be marked with a white cross.

The spinner holding the kip with three pennies, the tail side of pennies will be marked with a white cross.

The aim of the game is for the spinner to throw three heads in a row in the event that the spinner throws tails, the spinner shall lose the total of the moneys in the centre and the right to spin.

If you throw a tail youre out of the ring. If you throw three heads there is a way to keep betting against the house to win the pot, Mr Owens said.

The ringkeeper holds the money and the equivalent amount from the house or a tail bettor to cover the bet. Side bets are then placed around the ring which are made between two people.

The spinner must place a $10 bet down to enter the ring which is then covered by the house adding up to $20, Mr Owens said.If you throw heads the house then covers that $20 with another $20 (a total of $40 now lies in the ring).

After the spinner has thrown three consecutive pairs of heads they may withdraw from the centre and collect the total of moneys in the centre as Mr Owens calls the pot.

Anyone can come in and have a go as spinner. Its not scary and its not hard, you will get enough goes to get it right, he said.

As far as bets go outside the ring, Mr Owens suggests to save around $40 to spend on the day and begin with $5 bets.

The atmosphere is described as intense but a tonne of fun, Mr Owens said there will be plenty of professionals there on the day to help answer any questions.

Where to play:

2pm, Eden Fishermans Recreation Club

1pm, Top Pub in Pambula

4pm, Merimbula RSL

1.30pm, Grand Hotel Bega

3pm, Club Bega

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