Eden Magnet letters to the editor, August 3

GATE CRASHER: At Sunday's Eden Cup race meet a wayward echidna is escorted off the track before becoming a prickly hazard for the horses. More photos, Page 16

GATE CRASHER: At Sunday's Eden Cup race meet a wayward echidna is escorted off the track before becoming a prickly hazard for the horses. More photos, Page 16

Thank you for help

I would like to say a big thank you to the lovely couple who helped me last Friday when I tripped on a really bad piece of footpath in Beach Street in Merimbula. 

Also thanks to the lady from the dentist's office who brought me orange juice. 

Some of the footpaths in Merimbula are in a shocking state and the council needs to take responsibility. 

I know there have been a few incidents of footpath injury in Merimbula. 

Lyn Hall, Merimbula

Action on climate

While Rome suffers from water restrictions for the first time, droughts and fires are more frequent and in unexpected places, we are experiencing in the Bega Valley a super-early spring with warm temperatures, spring blossoms out already and winds picking up. 

Neither current state nor federal politicians in Australia seem to care about climate change or pollution.

Our local grassroots movement Boomerang Bags Bega Valley Sapphire Coast is counteracting climate change by reducing single-use plastic items and therefore the reliance on fossil fuels, avoids discarded fabric going to landfill, protects wildlife, keeps our waterways and oceans clean and keeps humans healthy.

The most common question we get asked is what to use as rubbish bin liner when the plastic bags are phased out? 

Rubbish bins can go nude and simply be rinsed out under the garden hose, if necessary. A lot of times the single-use plastic bags developed holes at the bottom anyway and did not really avoid dripping. 

Composting or digging plant scraps directly into the ground near a tree helps to avoid soggy, smelly residues in the bin. Butcher’s paper or old newspaper is good to wrap up meat-contaminated items. There will also still be plenty of plastic packaging around – e.g. from parmesan cheese, mail order satchels, animal feed bags etc. Soft plastic bags can be left at Coles now, which works together with Redcycle to recycle any soft plastic that can be scrunched up in one hand. Australia Post accepts used post satchels back for recycling.

Dörte Planert, Tathra

Help our homeless

Homeless Person’s Week runs from August 7-13. Currently there are over 105,000 homeless people in Australia, 44,000 of which are under the age of 25. Homeless Person’s Week aims to raise awareness for those doing it tough.

One in five homeless people seeking assistance are being turned away from vital, emergency accommodation services.  In modern Australia, these statistics are alarming and there is a lot of work to be done to fix this.  

People often only see homelessness as those sleeping and begging on the streets, but we need to ensure that our invisible homeless people are taken care of.  Homelessness is all around us. People who are forced to couch surf, sleep in cars or those who just don’t have a home to return to every night are the invisible homeless. It is often convenient for us to forget or ignore them but these people need our help.

Now in its fourth year, our campaign #laceitup aims to bring awareness and funds to fight homelessness. Purchasing these laces and wearing them during homeless person’s week reminds us that taking off our shoes is a luxury. Many homeless young people need to leave their shoes on in case they have to flee for safety and to stop thieves from taking their shoes.

This Homeless Person’s Week I implore everyone to stop and consider not only homeless Australians sleeping rough on the streets, but to think about how we can also help our invisible homeless.

Homelessness is a nationwide issue and only by working together can we tackle this concerning issue.

Father Chris Riley, CEO and Founder of Youth Off The Streets

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